Monday, January 5, 2009

Kansas City, MO: New Year's Eve Bash Hosted at US Bank

This New Year’s Eve we took it upon ourselves to get especially festive. Finding that the beer and liquor, fraternizing, and flirting just didn’t suffice, we gallivanted by the US Bank at 103rd and Holmes. We were pleased to spot several large rocks amidst the stunning corporate landscaping. We also located a sturdy metal wastebasket. Soon we were partying like never before, dancing under floodlights behind masks before surveillance cameras to an improvised symphony of shattering plate glass. At least 20 large windows bit the dust before all was said and done. All present will attest: that damn bank never looked so good.

As long as banks get bailed out, we will attack.
Hell—as long as there are banks, we will attack.

Solidarity with all bank robbers, vandals, burglars, and thieves, everyone who seizes the means of consumption rather than slave for wages!


http://anarchistnews.org/?q=node/5915

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Another bank robbery:

Police are investigating a bank robbery that occurred this morning at a Wachovia on the 600 block of Independence Boulevard.

At about 9:30 a.m., a man entered the bank branch, jumped over the counter and demanded money from the tellers, said Margie Long, Virginia Beach police spokeswoman. No weapon was seen.

The tellers put an undisclosed amount of cash into his backpack and he left the bank on foot, a police news release said. Police are unsure if he continued on foot or eventually got into a vehicle.

Source: http://hamptonroads.com/2009/01/virginia-beach-police-investigating-bank-robbery

Anonymous said...

Greek riot policeman shot; extremist group suspected

The officer is wounded in a barrage of 30 shots in the Athens area where nationwide youth rioting began. One of the guns used is linked to a 2007 attack by a far-left militant organization.

By Gina, Kalovirna and Sebastian Rotella

2:41 PM PST, January 5, 2009

Reporting from Athens and Madrid -- Masked gunmen shot and seriously wounded a riot policeman in Athens today, raising fears that weeks of nationwide unrest here have given way to violence by an armed extremist group.

The 20-year-old officer was hospitalized in critical but stable condition after being struck twice in a volley of at least 30 shots as he patrolled outside the Ministry of Culture near a van full of fellow officers about 3 a.m., authorities said.

The two gunmen escaped after firing an AK-47 assault rifle and a semi-automatic pistol in the ambush in Exarchia, a university neighborhood where youth riots erupted a month ago after the shooting death of a 15-year-old activist by a police officer.

The unrest by students and anarchists spread looting, arson, vandalism and assaults on police across the nation before largely subsiding over the Christmas holidays.

Ballistic tests connect the pistol used in today's shooting to an attack on a police station in April 2007 attributed to a far-left militant group known as Revolutionary Struggle, authorities said. The group also allegedly fired a rocket-propelled grenade on the U.S. Embassy in January 2007. There were no casualties and no arrests in that attack in Athens. The State Department has offered a reward of up to $1 million for information leading to the capture of those responsible.

Police were out in force searching for suspects in the officer's shooting this evening. Worsening fears that armed extremists are taking advantage of tension in the wake of the riots, the ballistic tests showed that the AK-47 that wounded the officer was used in an incident on Dec. 23 when gunmen opened fire on a riot police van near the Polytechnic University.

"I want to express how appalled and sad I am," said Prime Minister Kostas Karamanlis in a statement. "Police officers are hard-working fellow-citizens. They are civil servants, committed to serving all of us. Bullets fired against them are primarily aimed against democracy and society at large. I want to send a crystal clear message to all: Our democracy is robust."

The events revive grim images of Greece's past. Starting in the 1970s, a far-left group known as November 17 (N17) killed 21 people, including five employees of the U.S. Embassy, before it was finally dismantled in 2003.

Armed terrorism and the December riots are separate movements, but both reflect the difficulty that the Greek state has in preventing political violence, experts say. Many Greeks are indignant that authorities did not respond more forcefully to the youth unrest, blaming a deep-seated public hostility that seems to handcuff the police.

"I think it's that sense of impunity that poses the greatest problem to Greek officialdom," said John Sitilides, an expert on Greece at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. "We have to see this through a historical prism: It's tied to the same general theme of the inability of Greek officialdom to crack down hard on these groups, whether terrorists or anarchists."

Emerging in 2003, Revolutionary Struggle "aligned itself with the ideology of N17 and may have incorporated some previous members of N17," according to a State Department report on terrorism. The group has been blamed for the slaying of Greek guard at the home of the British defense attache in 2004 and with a failed attempt to bomb the vehicle of the Greek minister of culture in 2006, according to the State Department.

Source:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-greece6-2009jan06,0,2697460.story

Anonymous said...

Greek riot policeman shot; extremist group suspected

The officer is wounded in a barrage of 30 shots in the Athens area where nationwide youth rioting began. One of the guns used is linked to a 2007 attack by a far-left militant organization.

By Gina, Kalovirna and Sebastian Rotella
2:41 PM PST, January 5, 2009


Reporting from Athens and Madrid -- Masked gunmen shot and seriously wounded a riot policeman in Athens today, raising fears that weeks of nationwide unrest here have given way to violence by an armed extremist group.

The 20-year-old officer was hospitalized in critical but stable condition after being struck twice in a volley of at least 30 shots as he patrolled outside the Ministry of Culture near a van full of fellow officers about 3 a.m., authorities said.

The two gunmen escaped after firing an AK-47 assault rifle and a semi-automatic pistol in the ambush in Exarchia, a university neighborhood where youth riots erupted a month ago after the shooting death of a 15-year-old activist by a police officer.

The unrest by students and anarchists spread looting, arson, vandalism and assaults on police across the nation before largely subsiding over the Christmas holidays.

Ballistic tests connect the pistol used in today's shooting to an attack on a police station in April 2007 attributed to a far-left militant group known as Revolutionary Struggle, authorities said. The group also allegedly fired a rocket-propelled grenade on the U.S. Embassy in January 2007. There were no casualties and no arrests in that attack in Athens. The State Department has offered a reward of up to $1 million for information leading to the capture of those responsible.

Police were out in force searching for suspects in the officer's shooting this evening. Worsening fears that armed extremists are taking advantage of tension in the wake of the riots, the ballistic tests showed that the AK-47 that wounded the officer was used in an incident on Dec. 23 when gunmen opened fire on a riot police van near the Polytechnic University.

"I want to express how appalled and sad I am," said Prime Minister Kostas Karamanlis in a statement. "Police officers are hard-working fellow-citizens. They are civil servants, committed to serving all of us. Bullets fired against them are primarily aimed against democracy and society at large. I want to send a crystal clear message to all: Our democracy is robust."

The events revive grim images of Greece's past. Starting in the 1970s, a far-left group known as November 17 (N17) killed 21 people, including five employees of the U.S. Embassy, before it was finally dismantled in 2003.

Armed terrorism and the December riots are separate movements, but both reflect the difficulty that the Greek state has in preventing political violence, experts say. Many Greeks are indignant that authorities did not respond more forcefully to the youth unrest, blaming a deep-seated public hostility that seems to handcuff the police.

"I think it's that sense of impunity that poses the greatest problem to Greek officialdom," said John Sitilides, an expert on Greece at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. "We have to see this through a historical prism: It's tied to the same general theme of the inability of Greek officialdom to crack down hard on these groups, whether terrorists or anarchists."

Emerging in 2003, Revolutionary Struggle "aligned itself with the ideology of N17 and may have incorporated some previous members of N17," according to a State Department report on terrorism. The group has been blamed for the slaying of Greek guard at the home of the British defense attache in 2004 and with a failed attempt to bomb the vehicle of the Greek minister of culture in 2006, according to the State Department.

Source:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-greece6-2009jan06,0,2697460.story

Anonymous said...

Vandals get surveillance camera meant to get them

Principal had rigged device to computer, but only smashed glass shows up on screen.

FULLERTON, CA – Vandals have stolen what principal Matthew Barnett thought was a fail-safe way to halt increasing campus vandalism – a $700 surveillance camera rigged to a library computer.

When Nicolas Junior High staff returned from school vacation this morning, Barnett said the video camera – inside a library display case and pointed outside – recorded the smashing of reinforced glass but no suspects.

"I thought it was one more way to stop the increasing vandalism on campus," Barnett said.

He had placed his personal camera in a hidden area near the library window two days before school vacation. The unit was rigged to a computer to record all activity.

"I also set up the camera to link any activity to my personal e-mail," he said.

Barnett was at a New Year's Day party when he was notified by e-mail that glass was flexing on campus at 6 p.m. Police were called, and a report was taken.

"Unfortunately, the camera only showed the smashed glass, but we couldn't identify any people," Barnett said.

He said there are more cameras hidden on campus, and bright "event lights" have been installed throughout the school grounds.

"We want to keep this school open and inviting," Barnett said. "And we're doing everything we can to keep it that way."

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/barnett-camera-school-2273782-campus-way

Anonymous said...

WILSONVILLE, Ore. -- A brazen thief stole some $3,000 in merchandise, including four HDTVs from a Wilsonville Target store, sheriffs said.

The thief walked through the Target like any other shopper, filling his cart with goods, store workers said. But instead of heading to the checkout line, he simply walked out the door.

Target claimed the man took two 32-inch HDTVs, an iPod device and some movies on Dec. 18.

The store provided surveillance video that showed the man walking out the front door.

Security personnel at Wilsonville Target confirmed the thefts, and detectives said the man even called the store to brag about his crimes.

One week later he returned and stole two additional television sets.

Anonymous said...

Burglars who forced their way into a secured Contra Costa County sheriff's lot ransacked several patrol cars and stole weapons inside, the Sheriff's Office said Tuesday.

Three Colt semi-automatic assault rifles and a Remington shotgun were taken from cars parked in the lot at 1900 Muir Road between Monday night and Tuesday morning, said sheriff's Capt. Daniel Terry.

The break-in is similar to one in mid-December at a California Highway Patrol field office lot a little more than a mile away, at 5001 Blum Road, during which CHP cruisers were broken into and rifles and ammunition were stolen.

Terry said investigators could not say if the two burglaries were connected.

In the most recent incident, the burglars cut through a fence and used "heavy-duty equipment" to pry open the patrol car doors. In one instance, a softball-size hole had been bored into a car's door panel, Terry said.

In freeing the weapons that were secured by harnesses and electric locks, the burglars severely damaged the cars.

"They came prepared," Terry said.

The lot has no video surveillance. Investigators believe that multiple burglars were involved, and that they are locally based.

The lot was processed for evidence Tuesday. The FBI, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and the Northern California Regional Intelligence Center are assisting with the investigation.

"We're doing everything we can from a resource standpoint," Terry said. "Public safety remains our No. 1 issue in identifying the weapons and (suspects)."

Terry said the stolen firearms had been modified to law enforcement standards, and would look distinctive to anyone familiar with those types of weapons.